Where Does The Food Go After The Stomach?

We all know that the stomach is where food goes after we eat it. But what happens after that? What’s the next stop for all that food?

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After the stomach, food enters the small intestine.

The stomach is a J-shaped sac located between the esophagus and the small intestine. When you eat, food is chewed and travels down your esophagus into your stomach. The stomach muscles mix the food with digestive juices, which break down the food further. Food remains in the stomach for two to six hours while it is being mixed and broken down.

After the stomach, food enters the small intestine. The small intestine is approximately 20 feet long and 1 inch in diameter. It has three parts: the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum. The small intestine is where most of the digestion and absorption of food takes place.

Digestive juices from the pancreas and liver enter the small intestine through ducts. These juices help to further break downfood so that it can be absorbed into the bloodstream. The process of digestion and absorption takes six to eight hours. Vitamins, minerals, carbohydrates, proteins, and fats are all absorbed into the bloodstream through the walls of the small intestine.

The large intestine or colon is approximately 5 feet long and 3 inches in diameter. Its main function is to absorb water from indigestible food matter so that it can be eliminated from the body as feces. The large intestine also houses billions of bacteria that aid in digestion by breaking down undigested carbohydrates..

The small intestine is where most digestion and absorption of nutrients takes place.

After leaving the stomach, food enters the small intestine. The small intestine is divided into three sections: the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum. The small intestine is where most digestion and absorption of nutrients takes place.

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The duodenum is the first section of the small intestine. It is a C-shaped curve that wraps around the head of the pancreas. The jejunum is the middle section of the small intestine, and the ileum is the final section of the small intestine.

The walls of the small intestine are lined with tiny, finger-like projections called villi. Each villus has lots of blood vessels running through it so that nutrients can be absorbed into the bloodstream from the food we eat.

After the small intestine, food enters the large intestine.

After the small intestine, food enters the large intestine. The large intestine is divided into the cecum, colon, and rectum. The cecum is a pouch that stores undigested food. The colon absorbs water, salt, and vitamins from the undigested food and produces feces. The rectum stores feces until they are ready to be eliminated.

The large intestine absorbs water and some minerals from food.

The large intestine, also known as the colon, is the final section of the digestive tract. This long, coiled tube absorbs water and some minerals from food and transports waste material out of the body.

The large intestine is about 1.5m (5ft) long and 6cm (2.4in) in diameter. It has three main sections: the caecum, the colon and the rectum.

The caecum is a blind-ended sac at the junction of the small and large intestines. Attached to the caecum is a short tube called the appendix, which has no known function but may help to remove bacteria from the intestines.

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The colon consists of four main sections: the ascending colon, transverse colon, descending colon and sigmoid colon. These sections are separated by twists and turns in the bowel called haustrations.

The ascending colon goes upwards from the caecum to the transverse colon. The transverse colon runs across from left to right behind the stomach. The descending colon goes downwards from here to the sigmoid colon. The sigmoid colon is S-shaped and joins on to the rectum.

The rectum is about 12cm (4in) long and opens into the anus, which is where solid wastes (faeces) leave the body through muscle contractions called peristalsis.

The large intestine also houses bacteria that help break down food.

The large intestine, also known as the colon, is the final stop for digestion before food waste is eliminated from the body. The large intestine is much wider than the small intestine and is coiled like a hose. It absorbs water and electrolytes from food waste and houses bacteria that help break down food. The large intestine propels feces towards the rectum where they are eventually eliminated.

After the large intestine, food enters the rectum.

After the large intestine, food enters the rectum. The rectum is about six inches long and is the last stop before elimination. Here, water is absorbed from the feces and the feces are compacted.

The rectum is where feces are stored before they are eliminated.

The rectum is the end of the large intestine. It is about six inches long and connects to the anal canal. The rectum stores feces (waste) until it leaves the body through the anal canal.

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Feces are eliminated through the anus.

The process of digestion and absorption of food starts in the mouth where teeth break the food into smaller pieces for easier swallowing. Once swallowed, the food enters the esophagus where peristaltic contractions propel it towards the stomach.

The stomach is a muscular sac that acts as a temporary holding tank and digesting chamber. It mixes the food with stomach acids and enzymes to further break down proteins. After about three to five hours, most of the nutrients have been absorbed and the now semisolid waste is passed on to the small intestine.

The small intestine is about 20 feet long and is coiled like a hose. It further breaks down nutrients with digestive enzymes and absorbs them into the bloodstream. The large intestine absorbs most residual water, electrolytes, and vitamins produced by enteric bacteria before feces are eliminated through the anus.

The anus is the opening at the end of the digestive tract.

The food goes from your stomach to your small intestine. The small intestine is where most of the digestion and absorption of food takes place. The large intestine (colon) absorbs water, electrolytes, and vitamins produced by enteric bacteria. The rectum and anus store wastes until they are passed out of the body.

The anal sphincter is a muscle that controls the release of feces.

The rectum is the last portion of the large intestine and the anal canal is the final 2-3 centimeters through which feces are expelled. The anal sphincter is a muscle that controls the release of feces.

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